Total Carpet Care

What you need to know to get the most out of your investment

There is nothing like new carpet. It smells new, feels soft and fluffy, looks beautiful and makes a perfect statement about your style and taste. Compared to other floor coverings, carpet is relatively inexpensive to buy and install. Still, your carpet represents a sizeable investment in your home or business.

In order to get the most out of your carpet, you need a total carpet care program. A total carpet care program is a “retailer-to-recycling” approach to carpet care. To be effective, the program should include proper selection, professional installation, daily soil control, interim maintenance, scheduled restorative cleaning and the application of an appropriate carpet protector. The following tips can help you develop a simple carpet care program.

Carpet selection and professional installation–It may be“too late” for the carpet you already have, but carpet selection is an important part of making sure your carpets perform as expected. Some fibers are more resilient than others. Certain colors look cleaner longer because they hide soils better. Pile height, face weight or density and carpet construction all play a factor in how well your carpet will hold up.In a future issue, we will do an entire article on carpet selection and proper installation. For now, let’s focus on the carpet you already have.

Soil control: Prevent soils from getting on the carpet by using walk-off mats and keeping walkways and hard floors clean. If you remove your shoes when entering and wear clean house shoes, you will stop much of the soil from ever entering the home.

The most damaging soils are dry, gritty particulate soils that abrade and dull the surfaces of carpet fibers. This leads to an overall loss of luster in the high traffic areas. Regular use of a well-maintained vacuum cleaner is the single most important part of a total carpet care program. Remember to change vacuum cleaner bags when they are about half full.

Prompt attention to spots and spills is also highly important. Spots can eventually become permanent stains if allowed to age and oxidize on the carpet. It is best to attend to food and drink spills immediately. We will cover simple spot and spill removal techniques in a future article.

Interim maintenance: Some areas simply require more attention than others. The main entry of the home and the high traffic areas in the family room or just outside the kitchen tend to collect the great-est amount of soils. In most cases, it makes sense to clean these traffic areas between regularly scheduled cleanings. Maintenance cleaning usually goes quickly, dries fast and involves little or no furniture moving, so it is far less disruptive to your daily routine.

Scheduled professional cleaning: There comes a time when your carpet requires deep, restorative cleaning. This should be done before soil becomes visibly noticeable. By the time you see soil buildup, damage is already being done to the fibers. How often you need professional deep cleaning depends on several contributing factors including the number of occupants, presence of pets, vacuuming frequency, lifestyle and other considerations.

Protector application: Virtually every carpet manufactured in America comes with a factory–applied protector. Over time, this protector wears off and your carpet loses its ability to resist common household spots, spills and stains. It is important that this protective finish be reapplied after every professional cleaning. Your carpets will stay beautiful and last years longer.

Call A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner for more information on making your carpet last longer or to schedule your next carpet cleaning. We are happy to help.

Posted in Carpet Cleaning | Leave a comment

Causes and Cures for Household Dust

While you are unlikely to run around your house in an apron happily swiping at dust with a quaint feather dust-er, you probably do have to worry about dust removal. In fact, Americans spend over $10 billion a year on dust removal products. Add in vacuum cleaners, air filters, furnace filters and so forth and it is easy to see that household dust is big business.

But have you ever wondered what is in household dust? Is it just a nuisance or are there health concerns? When it comes to your home looking good and being clean dust is serious business.

The Dangers of Dust
Household dust contains all sorts of things from the outside atmosphere including dust from volcanic eruptions, forest fires, disintegrating meteors, silica, mica, clay and other minerals from wind erosion. Other constituents of dust come from inside the house including human and animal hairs, paper fiber, dead skin, deteriorating paint particles, ash and soot from fireplaces, candles, stoves and furnaces; sugars, starches, salt, crumbs and other food particles.

Some particles are of concern to humans, especially allergy sufferers: pollen, air pollution, pet dander, mold spores, dead insects, dust mites and their waste. There is growing concern about residues from pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers used both inside and outside our homes. Even roadway dust from automobile tires, brake linings and exhaust becomes household dust, and may contain carcinogens. There’s also dust from construction, demolition and deterioration of buildings.

The list goes on and on. In fact, you might just say that almost everything you look at is turning to dust. Need-less to say, there is no way to make your home completely dust-free. But preventing the buildup of dust will make your home a healthier place to live. The good news is that dust control doesn’t have to be difficult. It’s just a matter of changing the way you do a few things.

Following these easy tips will improve your air quality significantly:

  • While it is nice to let the fresh air in, keep windows and doors closed when pollen is high or it is windy outside.
  • Brush pets outdoors away from the house and use a damp pet wipe to remove remaining dander be-fore allowing them back into the house.
  • When cleaning around the house, do your dusting with an electrostatic cloth, duster or damp wipe so you are picking up and removing dust, not just pushing it around.
  • When dusting, work from high to low areas and work your way out of the room. Wait about an hour to allow the particles to settle before vacuuming.
  • Vacuuming is a great way to remove dust. However, it is important that you use a vacuum cleaner that has an efficient filter system. A vacuum with High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration improves air quality while you vacuum.
  • Don’t forget to vacuum your furniture too.
  • Install a high efficiency filter on your HVAC system and replace it monthly. For added protection, there are air purifiers designed to be attached to your duct system. Generally, these units require profession-al installation by a licensed contractor but they can be worth the cost if you have allergy sufferers in the home.
  • When dust becomes bonded to carpet and upholstery fibers by sticky or oily residues it’s time for professional cleaning. Call A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner every 6 to 12 months to keep dust from building up deep in your carpet fibers or your favorite chair.
Posted in A Cleaner Blog Post | Leave a comment

Bacteria, Fungi Spores, Oh My!

When you are in the business of cleaning, questions often arise regarding disinfecting and sanitizing. Recent Flu epidemics and the MRSA strain of bacteria have raised concerns among people regarding how to protect from possible infection. Fortunately, antimicrobials offer protection from unseen germs and bacteria on many surfaces. There are three levels of antimicrobials that kill or limit microbes and the spores that they use to reproduce.

Sterilizer
A sterilizer kills 100% of microbes and spores. In the spectrum of antimicrobial activity, a sterilizer is the strongest. Sterilization is impractical for everyday use because bacterial and fungal spores are extremely difficult to destroy. Extreme heat is one method of sterilization, but it is not practical outside of a medical environ-ment. Chemical sterilizers are toxic, corrosive irritants that are not safe for use by the general public.

Sanitizers
To sanitize a surface means to reduce levels of harmful microbes to a safe level. Most chemicals sanitizers have little or no effect on certain bacteria like Tuberculosis, and improper use may create resistant strains of harmful bacteria.

Disinfectants
Disinfectant is an EPA regulated term that can only be used on the label of products that have been tested and proven to kill or destroy at least 99.9% of all micro organisms; this doesn’t mean they destroy spores. There are a variety of disinfectants available to consumers, including common household bleach. Caution must be exercised when using bleach or any other EPA registered disinfectant to follow label directions carefully as misuse can lead to damage to materials or health risks. Disinfectants are named as to what kind of organisms they kill. The suffix cide, meaning “to kill” is added after the type of micro organism it targets. So a bactericide kills bacteria, fungicide kills fungi, and a virucide destroys viruses. Read the label to find out what the product is designed to do.

Making the Choice
What should you use? Since sterilizers are only needed for critical jobs like surgical instruments, we are left with disinfectants and sanitizers. As we have seen, sanitizers do not have the “kill power” that disinfectants do.So why would you choose to use a sanitizer instead of a disinfectant? You make the decision by weighing the risk presented by the micro organisms against the risks involved with the chemical itself. For example, there are chemical sanitizers that are used in commercial kitchens which are designed for treating food preparation surfaces. These products control bacteria on relatively clean surfaces but present almost no risk because of low toxicity. In a hospital things are different with known health issues at stake. People with a variety of sicknesses create the potential for contamination of many surfaces. Also, there are people with compromised immune systems who could become seriously ill from exposure to common microbes. When the risk from infection are greater, the necessity for a high-grade disinfectant becomes apparent. Although these tend to have higher levels of toxicity, the potential risk warrants their use. Your home is similar. Your kitchen counter is generally clean. Therefore keeping it clean usually means simply maintaining a sanitary condition. If you prepare raw meats on the counter you may consider using a good sanitizer/cleaner. In the bathroom a stronger disinfectant might be appropriate. You could also use a surface disinfectant in sick rooms to kill infectious microbes. A clean home is important. But, the most important thing to remember is that all cleaning agents, sanitizers and disinfectants should be stored and used according to the label directions. Failure to do so could cause more harm than good.

Posted in A Cleaner Blog Post | Leave a comment

The Truth About Spots and Stains

You may have seen some of the commercials on television that show a bottle of spot remover that can quickly and easily remove stains from carpet and upholstery like magic. Red wine, ketchup, coffee, fruit punch, spaghetti sauce, grass stains and more are removed in seconds with no rubbing or scrubbing. Just spray and blot!

If only it were that easy!

The truth is that advertisers are not being completely honest with you. The spots are usually on new carpet that is most likely olefin or polyester–two fibers that are difficult to stain. They choose spots that are easily removed by the chemistry of their spotter. The same cleaner on dried mustard on a three-year-old nylon carpet would produce less than stellar results.

In reality, the ease or difficulty of spot removal will vary depending on fiber type, age and condition of the car-pet, age of the spot, the type of stain, and even the cleaning agents and methods previously used on the car-pet.

The first step is to identify the spot. Sometimes you can’t be sure what it is, so with unknown spots, we play“detective.” Using clues like the color, location, texture, odor and shape we figure out what it might be.

The next step is to categorize the spot. There are four categories of spots:

Category 1: Water-soluble
Water-soluble spots respond to water-based solutions. There are several spotting agents that fit into this category. Acid spotters work best on alkaline soils. Alkaline spotters work on common acid-based soils. Enzyme spotters break down protein spots like blood, milk, eggs and grass.

Category 2: Solvent-soluble
Solvent-soluble spots are best treated with solvent-based spotters. This category includes tar, petroleum grease, lipstick, ink, dried paint, gum and adhesives.

Category 3: Insoluble spots
Insoluble spots include substances that cannot be dissolved with water or solvent spotters. Some examples are graphite, carbon, fireplace ash and powdered copier toner.

Category 4: Specialty treatments
Specialty treatments include strong acids, oxidizers, reducing agents and specialized chemical reactions. Rust, food dyes, urine stains and mustard fall into this category.

First things first. Before applying any spotting agent we determine the fiber type. It is important to be sure that the spotting agents and cleaning method will not harm the fiber.

Once we have selected the correct spotter and qualified the fiber content, spot removal will follow 5 basic steps:

1. Remove excess material with scraping or blotting.
2. Apply the appropriate spotter to the spot. Do not oversaturate the carpet.
3. Agitate gently. Never scrub or rub the carpet.
4. Rinse.
5. Blot with a clean white towel.

These are the basic steps. Our techniques, tools and processes will vary depending on your unique situation. Any remaining discoloration after the spot removal is a stain, and will require more expertise and specialized methods.

A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner technicians are experts at identifying, categorizing and treating the spots and stains that other companies can’t. Call us today if you have questions or need help removing spots, odors and stains from your carpet.

Posted in A Cleaner Blog Post | Leave a comment

Understanding Your Carpet and How to Solve Problems

When selecting carpet, choosing the right color is often the most difficult part of the process. Most people make relatively neutral choices, picking colors such as beige, taupe, gray and even off white because they blend well with just about any decor. Yet, carpets in bold colors like burgundy, deep, rich browns, regal blues and purples, soothing greens and even multi-colored patterns are not uncommon either. The interesting thing is that the color itself is not what protects a carpet from stains. Rather, it’s how the color is dyed that matters. When you know how your carpet was colored you can make more informed cleaning and spot treatment choices.

Extrusion and Coloration
Many carpets, such as polyester and Olefin, are created through extrusion. This is the process of melting plastic balls of certain colors, then extruding the liquid through small holes to create strands. In this way the color goes all through the thread; it’s called “solution dyeing.” This creates the most color fast carpets, fibers which are highly resistant to fading and bleaching because the color goes all the way through. These carpets are most often found in commercial applications, but they can be in private homes as well. One such extruded fiber, Olefin, is common inBerber style carpets. Olefin fibers are not very absorbent, so they are highly stain resistant.

Fiber & Yarn Dyeing
Sometimes, the material is extruded or otherwise turned into rough fibers before color is applied. Then, various methods are used to apply dye to these fibers before they are spun into yarn. This type of dyeing provides great color penetration, but it is expensive and rarely used on carpets; it’s more common on wool and other high end fabrics. If the fiber is spun into yarn, then dyed, this is yarn dyeing, a common way that multiple colors of fibers are then woven into the carpet to make a variety of patterns, as is common in hotels and office buildings.

Print Dyeing
In print dyeing the carpet is made without color variety. Then, dyes are sprayed or painted on the carpet using stencils. This is common on novelty carpets such as playrooms, daycare centers and movie theaters.

Continuous Dye
The most common dyeing technique is the continuous dye method. After the yarns have been stitched into the backing material, the carpet passes through jets that spray hot dye into the face yarns. This is the fastest and most cost-effective way to dye carpet. Chances are, if you have a light to medium solid-color carpet, it was dyed in this way.

Keeping Carpet Looking Good
The dyeing process of a carpet determines how it resists color loss, fading and bleaching. An experienced cleaning company will know what chemicals and processes to use in order to get the best cleaning and maintenance results from a particular carpet. Using the wrong cleaning agents or processes could result in fading, loss of luster and other issues, so be sure to have your carpets cleaned at least semi-annually by A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner.

Posted in Carpet Cleaning | Leave a comment

Maintaining Carpets Keeps Your Family Healthy

A United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study revealed that carpet actually helps to clean out air in our homes and offices. The carpet acts as a filter, trapping soils, gasses and pollutants such as pet and human dander, pollen, and even air pollution. This is great news since nearly every home in America has wall to wall carpet installed in one or more areas.

Despite this study, some people still believe that carpet is bad for indoor air quality and causes health problems like allergies and asthma. The truth is that properly maintained carpets actually improve indoor air quality. The key to keeping the air in your home healthy is to have a maintenance routine for your carpet.

EPA Guidelines for Cleaning
Periodic professional cleaning is a major part of an effective carpet and air quality maintenance routine, eliminating the contaminants that build up over time. Of course, every household has its own unique combination of factors such as environment, number of occupants, children, pets, and smoking or non-smoking, etc. So how often should you have your carpets cleaned?

Fortunately, the EPA is there to help with some basic guidelines for a total carpet maintenance plan based on the kind of use your carpet receives, as follows:
 In a home with two people who do not smoke, the EPA recommends you have your carpets cleaned every 6-12 months, more often if you have a particularly dusty outside environment or an extremely humid or cold environment.
 If you smoke, the carpets should be cleaned at least every four months.
 If you have kids or pets these numbers cut in half. In fact, a home with 2 adults, a child and pets should be cleaned at least every 3-6 months, but every month if you live in a very contaminated or dusty area.
 Offices and restaurants, nursing homes and daycare centers should be cleaned once a month or even more frequently.

“Wait a minute!” you may say. “It seems a little extreme to clean my carpet that often.” But think about the source of these recommendations. This is the Environmental Protection Agency, created to help assure the health and safety of living things in a variety of environments, including outdoors and inside homes and buildings. So these recommendations are based on cleaning for health, not simply appearance.

Looking Dirty vs. Being Dirty
Carpet is designed to hide soil, so it can hold a lot of dirt before it begins to look “dirty.” Unseen contaminants build up in the carpet over time to the point where they may have a negative effect on the occupants of the structure, especially those with underdeveloped, sensitive or compromised immune sys-tems. The key is to avoid letting the carpet get to the point where this happens.

Maintaining Your Carpet between Cleanings
Are we saying if you don’t get all of your carpets cleaned according to these EPA guidelines that you and your family will get sick? Not necessarily. These guidelines are just that, a guide. There are things you can do to reduce the frequency of professional cleaning. First, make sure you vacuum of-ten; the more the better. Also, be prompt about cleaning up spots and spills. Use doormats at all entrances. Don’t wear street shoes in the house. Final-ly, avoid going barefoot because body oils get on the carpet and attract dirt.

Regardless of how neat and tidy you are, there comes a time when you need professional carpet cleaning. Call A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner to schedule your next cleaning or to help choose a cleaning program that fits your lifestyle. You and your family will breathe easier; your carpets will look better and last longer.

Posted in Carpet Cleaning | Leave a comment

Spend a little now… save a lot later

Fall is the perfect time to do some maintenance on your home’s exterior. Warm weather and the higher humidity of summer cause materials to shift and expand, then as the weather cools and the humidity decreases the process reverses. This can leave your home with areas that water, pests and rot can penetrate. Now is the time to act.

As Winter Approaches
Paint, caulk, shingles, wood, rubber, vinyl and siding are all affected by high temperature and UV radiation from the sun. As a result, the exterior envelope of your home may not be as “tight” as it was in the spring. As weather gets cooler, materials tend to shrink and harden. Air is drier, resulting in further shrinkage as materials lose moisture. Rubber seals around doors and windows become brittle. Caulk separates from siding and trim, allowing outdoor air and damaging moisture to enter.

The wood around doors and windows can rot. High moisture levels encourage insects and termites to make your home their home. Hidden mold growth on wood, drywall and other porous surfaces causes millions of dollars in structural damage every year. Moisture is the primary cause. You can take a few easy steps to ensure your home is in good shape as winter approaches. Following is a list of things that you can check out and another list the ambitious home owner can do,or which you can hire an inspector to check out for you.

Easy Fall Checkpoints
As fall approaches take a slow walk around your house and check the following:
 Visually check out all windows and doors. Look at the wood trim to ensure it is not rotted or pulling away. Check the caulk to ensure it is flexible and well-sealed. Pound in loose trim nails andre-caulk if necessary. Remove brittle, deteriorated caulk before resealing.
 Check weather stripping to ensure pliability and good seal. If you can see daylight around the door or window then you may need to install new weather stripping.
 Look around windows, doors, soffits and other areas for water intrusion. If you see dark stains or rotted areas you may have a leak and want to call a professional. After the leak is fixed you can replace damaged wood. Or, check out this great product called “Git Rot”, available at marine centers, for repairing rotted wood.
 If you have a basement check it for leaks by touching the wall, especially where it meets the floor. Sometimes, minor water issues can be corrected with sealing paint.

Getting Professional Help
If you are a very handy home owner then do the following checks as well. Otherwise, hire a pro to:
 Have your gutters cleaned and checked. Ensure all downspouts are directed away from your house. If you don’t have gutters, consider having seamless gutters installed; they are actually quite inexpensive compared to other home improvements.
 Have the roof inspected. Many roofing companies will do this for free, just be sure to pick a reputable one. Ensure they look for gaps and issues around the chimney, plumbing stacks and any other roof penetrations.
 If you have a crawl space under your home, hire a professional to crawl under it once a year and check it out for plumbing leaks, structure issues, and animal infestation.

The old saying says that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. It can save you a ton of money in the long run as well.

Posted in A Cleaner Blog Post | Leave a comment

What do Those Codes on Furniture Tags Really Mean?

Look under the cushions of a typical piece of upholstered furniture and you will usually find a fabric care tag. This tag should include an indication of the recommended procedures for maintenance and routine cleaning of that particular piece of furniture. Part of the tag will likely assure you that all new materials were used; this is a reference to the stuffing inside the piece. What you want to know, more, is how to keep this piece of furniture looking its best, so look for another tag.

The Cleaning Tag
You should find a tag that specifically lists a cleaning code. Before we go into what these codes mean, please note that these tags and codes are merely a guideline to assist you in spot cleaning only. The tag is also an indication to the professional cleaner how to avoid color loss, bleeding, browning or shrinkage during cleaning.

Fabrics are made from a variety of fibers including cotton, polyester, silk, rayon, nylon, polypropylene, acetate, acrylic, wool and blends thereof. They can be woven in a variety of ways, as well as having an unlimited array of dye methods, colors and patterns. All of these different combinations make avoiding possible cleaning reactions very challenging, but possible – if you know what you’re doing!

Improper selection of cleaning agents or methods can lead to permanent damage to fabrics. An example is crushed velvet. If it is treated improperly, it can lose its softness, luster and crimp. This sort of damage is irreversible. Many floral or multi-colored patterns are printed on the fabric rather than woven into it. Extra care must be taken when cleaning these as the colors are only on the surface. The wrong chemical can actually remove the printed dyes, or destabilize them to the point that the colors run into each other. Again, this is uncorrectable.

So, effective and safe cleaning of your upholstered furniture means knowing how to clean it. Part of that requires deciphering the code, so here are the cleaning codes and their meanings:

W: This codes tells you to spot clean only with water based shampoo or foam upholstery cleaner. If your tag has a “W” be careful not to over wet the area or use any solvents.

S: This codes tells you the opposite of“W”–it says to spot clean only with a water free dry cleaning solvent. But remember to always pretest a small, inconspicuous area before proceeding. Be careful not to oversaturate the material or to use any water.

WS or SW: When you see this tag spot clean with upholstery shampoo, foam from a mild detergent, or mild dry cleaning solvent.

X: This is a really important one which means to clean only by vacuuming or light brushing with a non-metallic, stiff bristle brush. Never use any water or solvent-based cleaners on furniture that has this tag.

No matter what tag you see, remember these basic suggestions:
• Always clean spills promptly, and call A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner if you are in doubt.
• Never rub, but rather blot up liquids to avoid damaging the furniture.
• Always start cleaning from the outside of the stain, working your way in, to avoid spreading the stain.
• Do not remove cushion covers for cleaning as they may shrink or misshape and not go back on properly.

Posted in A Cleaner Blog Post | Leave a comment

Is it okay for me to use those miracle carpet stain removers I see on TV?

Whether you watch television during daytime talk shows, in the middle of prime time, or during a fit of insomnia at 2 a.m., you simply can’t avoid them: commercials, and infomercials, trying to convince you that some liquid in the bottle will magically remove any spot or stain you have on your carpet, no matter where it originated, how long it’s been there, or what type of carpet you have. While it is possible that some of these products have some value, it is not possible that any product can do all of these things. Every fiber is different. Every spill is different. So there is simply no one-stop solution to clean everything. And, unfortunately, using some of these “miracle” stain removers in the wrong place can cause irreversible damage to your carpet.

Miracle Oxygen Cleaners
One popular product that people tend to try, and place great faith in, is the “Oxy” cleaners seen on infomercials. If you choose to use these cleaners, exercise caution. Professional carpet cleaning companies are seeing more and more damage being done to carpet by the oxygen bleaches in these cleaners. The damage can range from minor color loss to large permanent yellow stains caused by the chemical reaction with the carpet fibers. Theoretically, these products should be safe if used according to the manufacturer’s directions. But there are things that can and do affect the chemical reaction and can make results vary greatly. For instance, the exact nature of the spot you are trying to remove matters. Some stains do not react well to oxygen bleaches, and can even become permanent if you use those products. Another problem is sunlight. Under sunlight, the oxidizer becomes more chemically active and aggressive, resulting in heightened bleaching action. Remember, anything that has the ability to remove food coloring has the potential to destabilize the dyes used to give your carpet its color.

Other Product Promises
There are other products that use high pH detergents in conjunction with the oxygen bleach to help break down greasy spots and spills. While this can be quite effective in removing the offending spots, it can leave behind a residue that destroys the stain resistant properties of your carpet. This is not visible damage, however it is quite real. The result is an area that is“unprotected”and therefore vulnerable to permanent staining the next time something is spilled there. Also, these highly alkaline residues are often quite sticky, attracting soils. So even though the spot goes away, the area keeps getting dirtier and dirtier. So you apply more cleaner and leave more residue, in a never-ending, frustrating cycle of futility. If you had the ability to apply, agitate, rinse and thoroughly extract the chemicals, it wouldn’t be so bad. But removing all of the stuff you pour on the carpet can be quite difficult. So what can you do? Your safest bet when you have a difficult stain is to call A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner before attempting to remove it yourself. We are an experienced carpet cleaning company, and can give you options as to the best way to handle the situation while avoiding any damage to your carpet. We can also give you tips for removing small spots in the future.

Posted in Carpet Cleaning | Leave a comment

Be Healthy, Wealthy and Wise with Carpet

Carpet is a great way to decorate because of the textures, colors and patterns available. It looks good, but it also provides a variety of benefits. Carpet insulates, typically resulting in 10% or more in energy savings. Carpet absorbs sound, making a house quieter and more relaxing. And of course carpet is safer, reducing the occurrence of slips and falls and the severity of associated injuries from these accidents.

But did you realize that carpet is also an economical and prudent choice for maintenance and health reasons?

Little Maintenance
Carpet requires less maintenance than hard surface floors such as hardwood, vinyl and tile. Interim care of carpet is accomplished simply by vacuuming. Depending on the number of people and pets, this may be done in as little as 2 or 3 hours a month in the typical household. Aside from prompt attention to spills, this is usually all that is needed between professional cleanings.

By contrast, think of all the cleaners, sealers, waxes and polishes needed to keep a hard floor looking good and the amount of time it takes to sweep and mop. Let’s not forget how much it can cost to have a professional restore a scratched, dull marble or wood floor, or to clean, remove stains and seal tile and grout. While it is true that hard surface floors are easier to clean in the event of a liquid spill, properly maintained modern carpeting has protectors such as3M Scotchgard and DuPont Teflon factory applied which helps them clean-up well.

Of course, eventually, this protection wears off, just as the protective finish on a new car does. And just as you need to wax your car to refresh that protection, your carpet should have a protector reapplied periodically. In cases where the protector is maintained, prompt response usually achieves good results in spill removal.

Carpet is Good for Your Health
Contrary to opinions by well-meaning but ill-informed “experts,” carpet that is properly maintained actually improves indoor air quality. How? Carpet acts as a filter, trapping pollutants such as dust, pollen, dander, smoke, and dust mite contamination as air passes through it. Studies conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revealed that carpet acts as a “sink” for pollutants. This fact caused some experts to contend that carpet contributed to poor indoor air quality and associated ill health effects.

But this view misses one key point
As the EPA pointed out, carpet acts as a “sink,” trapping these pollutants, instead of allowing them to be distributed up into the breathing zone. The result? Homes and buildings with properly maintained carpets have better air quality in the “breathing zone” than those with other flooring types. So, as these contaminants build-up in the carpet they simply must be removed by professional cleaning. This creates a cycle of cleanliness. On the other hand, with hard surface flooring, all it takes is a small amount of air movement from an open door, or even foot traffic to disperse the dust and pollutants into the breathing zone.

So to reap the financial and health benefits of your carpet, give A Cleaner Carpet Cleaner a call for proper maintenance and periodic, professional cleaning.

Posted in Carpet Cleaning | Leave a comment